Purchasing a new deep cycle battery can be costly. Cells from such a battery, running at approximately 2 volts, can run you from $300 to $600 – quite a steep price, considering even a small, 12 – volt setup, running 650 Ah, would cost around $1,800!

Perhaps you merely need a replacement; perhaps you’re trying your hand at desulfating and reselling deep cycle batteries. A large, used deep cycle battery can easily be broken down into its still-functional cells and incorporated into an eco-friendly, home renewable energy system, which would require anywhere from 12 to 48 volts.

Or perhaps you’re looking to replace a dead battery, thus a battery from a golf cart might serve just as well at powering a DIY electric car, for reasonably cheap (only $80) and provide 220 Ah, but for a only quarter of the time.

You can save a substantial amount of money from restoring old batteries because a refurbished battery can be sold for $100 each, and last double the time – or more – than the smaller, golf cart batteries.

The first set of old deep cycle batteries I personally refurbished were for free, disposed or recycled from a business. In breaking them down, I realized the majority of cells in any given recycled battery are still operational; typically, only a small handful of cells no longer work (in my case, only three).

At 24 volt, 700 Ah, with 12 cells in each, I recovered twenty-one still-functional cells. If I chose to sell them (rather than keep them, as I did), I could have profited up to $2,100: a healthy margin for a recycled battery! But bear in mind, despite all your best efforts, a battery will never return to its original capacity.

By removing the bad cells, however, up to a vigorous 90% might be recovered. Always remember to recycle those cells that are no longer useful to you. It’s easy to locate deep cycle batteries to begin refurbishing.

Get in touch with local business that may be able to provide you with free, recycled batteries. Warehouses or recycling depots would be a good start.

It’s best if you offer to pick up the batteries yourself, and you may be required to sign a waiver or other paperwork, for environmental factors, but for the most part, such companies are grateful not to have to dispose of the batteries themselves. Such old, exhausted batteries are almost always simply taking up space!

Deep cell batteries are rather large, and quite heavy (a 24-volt battery can weigh up to a thousand pounds), but with a truck they can generally be transported; anything larger than a 24-volt deep cell will require careful preplanning.

Be sure to have arranged your transportation well in advance. Alternatively, you can always inquire at any golf cart service garage in your area, as they will often offer stock for sale and may even deliver, but this will likely cost you a fee – usually only a few cents per pound.

At such a low rate, delivery is certainly an option. But, even if you chose to take the delivery route, if you have the skill and time, refurbishing a deep cycle battery is well worth it, whether you’re recycling for your own benefit or for profit.

Electric Golf Cart Battery Reconditioning

If you are thinking of refurbishing old electric golf cart batteries and bring them back to live, check out the Electric Golf Cart Battery Guide at www.golfcartbatteryguide.info/ for easy tips and suggestion.

==> Click here to visit Electric Golf Cart Battery Guide!